#BD9
»Is the European dream over?«

30 March 2017 | 6.30pm
European Commission’s Representation in Germany

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BD9Kirchick Kühnel

In the age of Brexit and Trump, populism and nationalism, European integration is under serious threat. Is the dream over? Or could there yet be a new European renaissance?

The Ninth Berlin Debate tackled these crucial questions with the motion:

»Is the European dream over?«

The debate brought together two leading voices:

Proposition
James Kirchick
US-based author of The End of Europe, and a leading commentator for Foreign Policy magazine, The Daily Beast, and the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.

Opposition
Richard Kühnel
Representative of the European Commission in Berlin – the man whose job it is to keep the European dream alive in its most powerful member state.

Moderator

Sarah Raine
Sarah Raine 
is a freelance consultant, writing and researching on issues of geo-politics and security.  Alongside her commercial consulting, she works as a Senior Consulting Fellow for the London office of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) and as a non-resident Transatlantic Fellow for the Berlin office of the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF).

This event was made possible by the support of the European Commission’s Representation in Germany.

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#BD8
»Ohne gemeinsame Einlagensicherung keine europäische Bankenunion«

18 October 2016
European Commission’s Representation in Germany

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bildschirmfoto-2016-10-06-um-19-20-18The 8th Berlin Debate had its focus on political efforts to establish a genuine Eurozone banking union, and proposals put forward by the European Commission to create a supra-national bank deposit guarantee insurance scheme.

While the Eurozone crisis has abated over the last 12 months, there remain significant challenges within the architecture of the single currency, notably in relation to the banking sector. Is a deposit insurance scheme, collectively financed by the single currency’s member states, necessary to ensure future banking sector stability, and remove the dangerous link between banks and sovereigns within the Eurozone?

Alternatively, would this insurance scheme increase moral hazard, and expose German Sparkassen to excessive risk taking and poor management within more profligate European banks?

As part of our continued series of events examining the future of the Eurozone, the Eighth Berlin Debate tackled these crucial questions with the motion:

»Ohne gemeinsame Einlagensicherung keine europäische Bankenunion«

The debate brought together two leading voices:

Proposition
Prof. Michael Burda is professor at the Humboldt University of Berlin, and Deputy Coordinator of the Collaborative Research Center 649 „Economic Risk“. He serves in the scientific councils of the Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (RWI), and the Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH). He is research fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) and a fellow of the European Economic Association (EEA). From 2011 – 2014, he served as President (Vorsitzender) of the Verein für Socialpolitik.

Opposition
Dr. Karl-Peter Schackmann-Fallis is Executive Member of the Board responsible for Economy, Policy and Bank Management, at the German Savings Banks Association (Deutscher Sparkassen- und Giroverband (DSGV). He was Chairman of the European Banking Industry Committee in 2009. Nominated by the European Parliament as well as Vice-Chairman of the EU’s Inter- Institutional Monitoring Group for financial services (IIMG) from 2005 to 2007. He is a member of the advisory board of the German Federal Financial Supervisory Authority (BaFin), the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC), the World Savings Banks Institute, the European Savings Banks Group and Member of the Risk and Credit Committee and Participations Committee of Landesbank Hessen-Thüringen.

Moderator

GA
Guido Axmann
Guido considered it to be more and more difficult to build a personal opinion on complex societal issues by simply reading the news, thus he created with his co-founder and TV journalists Richard Walker Berlin Debates. Moderating inspiring debates give him the pleasure to navigate unknown territories. The debate format helps him to deep dive into opposing perspectives to build an informed personal opinion within only 90 minutes of vibrant debating. 

This event was made possible by the support of the European Commission’s Representation in Germany.

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#BD7
»The EU needs its own army«

17 February 2016

Akademie der Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung Berlin

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4 Speakers BD7

Is Europe equipped to deal with the extraordinary security challenges confronting it in 2016 and beyond? Is it responsible to be so dependent on NATO and the patience of American taxpayers? Is it not time for the EU to step up and establish a full-scale military capability of its own? Or would this be the wrong answer to the threats we face — and potentially even a counter-productive one?

The 7th Berlin Debate tackled these crucial questions of European security with the motion:

»The EU needs its own army«

The debate brought together four leading voices from across the Western alliance:

Proposition

Vaira Vīķe-Freiberga, Former Latvian President
Constanze Stelzenmüller, Brookings Institution

Opposition

Gideon Rachman, Financial Times
Jeremy Shapiro, European Council on Foreign Relations

Vaira Vīķe-Freiberga served two terms as President of the Republic of Latvia during 1999-2007, and played a leading role in Latvia gaining membership of NATO and the European Union. She was named Special Envoy on the reform of the United Nations in 2005 and was an official candidate of the Baltic States for the position of Secretary-General in 2006. Dr Vīķe-Freiberga continues to play a prominent role in international affairs and has been President of the Club de Madrid since 2014.

Constanze Stelzenmüller is the inaugural Robert Bosch Senior Fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution. She was previously a Senior Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF) and directed GMF’s Transatlantic Trends survey program. Dr Stelzenmüller is also the former director of GMF’s Berlin office and was an editor at DIE ZEIT, covering political, defence, and international security issues.

Gideon Rachman has been the Chief Foreign Affairs Columnist for the Financial Times since 2006. Prior to joining the FT, Mr Rachman spent 15 years as a correspondent and senior editor at The Economist, which included spells as the newspaper’s foreign correspondent in Brussels, Washington and Bangkok. His particular interests include American foreign policy, the European Union and globalisation.

Jeremy Shapiro is Research Director at European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR), and was previously a fellow at the Brookings Institution. Prior to Brookings he was a member of the U.S. State Department’s policy planning staff, where he advised the Secretary of State on US policy in North Africa and the Levant. Mr Shapiro also served as the senior advisor to US Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs.

Moderator

Sarah Raine
Sarah Raine 
is a freelance consultant, writing and researching on issues of geo-politics and security.  Alongside her commercial consulting, she works as a Senior Consulting Fellow for the London office of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) and as a non-resident Transatlantic Fellow for the Berlin office of the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF).


This event was made possible by the support of the European Commission’s Representation in Germany and the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung

 

You can download the Debate report here

 

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#BD6
»The data revolution will improve our lives«

12 November 2015
F.A.Z. Atrium Berlin | Mittelstraße 2-4 10117 Berlin, Germany

The collection and analysis of data is fundamentally changing the way in which we interact, learn, work and do business. How can Europe realise the full economic potential of the data revolution in a human-centered way?

With these questions becoming more relevant than ever, the debaters presented their statements on the following motion:

»The data revolution will improve our lives«

At this exclusive event, two renowned speakers engaged in an intensive debate on the data revolution and discussed the unique advantages and significant challenges it poses for policymakers, corporations, and civil society.

The debaters

Proposition
Professor Alex “Sandy” Pentland
sandy

Professor Alex “Sandy” Pentland is a pioneer in organisational engineering, mobile information systems, and computational social science. As the Toshiba Professor of Media Arts and Sciences at MIT and Academic Director of Data-Pop Alliance, he is one of the most-cited computer scientists in the world and was named by Forbes as one of the world’s seven most powerful data scientists. Pentland co-leads the World Economic Forum Big Data and Personal Data initiatives, directs MIT’s Human Dynamics Laboratory and the MIT Media Lab Entrepreneurship Program, and is a founding member of the Advisory Boards for Nissan, Motorola Mobility, and a variety of start-up firms.

Opposition
Andrew Keen
keen

Andrew Keen is amongst the world’s best-known and controversial commentators on the digital revolution. He is the author of three books: Cult of the Amateur, Digital Vertigo, and the internationally acclaimed ‘The Internet Is Not The Answer’. Mr Keen is executive director of the Silicon Valley innovation salon FutureCast, the host of Internet chat show “Keen On”, a Senior Fellow at CALinnovates, and columnist for CNN. A highly sought-after public speaker around the world, he was included in GQ Magazine’s 100 Most Connected Men in 2015.

Berlin Debates is pleased to be a partner for this event.

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#BD5
»Eurozone leaders must seize this moment to create a political and fiscal union«

15 July 2015
French Embassy, Berlin
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BD5 Speakers x5

Summer 2015: the unity of the currency union was in grave doubt with “Grexit” looking more likely than ever before.

As events in Greece unfolding, many were looking beyond the current crisis to the years – and decades – ahead. The five presidents of the European Commission, Council, Parliament, Eurogroup and ECB published their ideas for reform – but were they equal to the challenge?

How radically did the eurozone need to change? Did the Greek case prove the need for profound political and fiscal integration? Or did it prove that such integration is impossible?

With these questions becoming more relevant than ever, the fifth Berlin Debate looked to the future of the single currency with the motion:

»Eurozone leaders must seize this moment to create a political and fiscal union«

The debate brought together five highly influential speakers from the eurozone’s three largest member states:

Keynote:

Mario Monti, former Italian Prime Minister

Proposition:

Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, Chair, French Council of Economic Analysis
Peter Bofinger, German Council of Economic Experts

Opposition:

Reint Gropp, President, Halle Institute for Economic Research
Otmar Issing, former Chief Economist and Member of the Executive Board, European Central Bank

The debate was organised in partnership with the European Commission Berlin and the French Embassy.

You can download the Debate Report here.

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#BD4
»Europe needs fiscal stimulus«

3 March 2015
European Commission, Berlin
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BD4 Speakers

With the eurozone facing deflation, the ECB printing money and Greek voters rebelling against austerity, in March 2015 Germany was once again under huge pressure to change its euro crisis course. Our fourth debate asked if austerity had gone too far – was it time to match the ECB’s move with fiscal stimulus? Or was it more important than ever for Berlin to stick to its guns?

Speakers

Opening remarks on the eurozone economy:
Jean-Claude Trichet, former President, European Central Bank

Proposition
Jan Vincent-Rostowski, former Polish Finance Minister
Natacha Valla, Deputy Director, CEPII, Paris

Opposition
Ruta Arumäe, Economic Advisor to the Estonian Prime Minister
Jürgen Stark, former Member of the Executive Board, European Central Bank

In partnership with the European Commission Berlin.

You can download the Debate Report here.

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#BD3
»The Grand Coalition is on the wrong track with its pensions reform«

2 July 2014
European Commission, Berlin
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MF vs HJU

Germany is an ageing, shrinking society. In the coming decades, millions more pensioners will have to be supported by millions fewer workers. A demographic crisis is looming.

This is nothing new: Gerhard Schröder’s government saw it coming and raised the retirement age. Many other European countries have been doing the same. But in 2014 the Grand Coalition backtracked with its “Rentenpaket”, making it easier for some workers to take early retirement. The “Mütterrente” will further add to the costs facing future generations.

Supporters argued the reform was about justice for people who have paid into the system over long working lives. Critics said it would make the demographic crisis worse.

Our third debate – and our first in German – pitted one of Germany’s leading economists against one of its leading trade unionists. It was a thought-provoking clash over generational justice, economic wisdom, and visions of how to run Germany.

Speakers

Proposition
Marcel Fratzscher, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin)
Marcel Fratzscher is President of the German Institute for Economic Research, Professor of Macroeconomics and Finance at Humboldt University Berlin, and an Advisory Board member at the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy.

Opposition
Hans-Jürgen Urban, IG Metall
Hans-Jürgen Urban is an Executive Board member of IG Metall where he is responsible for social policy, health and working arrangements.

 

You can download the Debate Report here:

English (pdf)

German (pdf)

See press release.

 

In partnership with the European Commission Berlin.

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#BD2
»Germany’s approach to the euro debt crisis has been proven right«

26 March 2014
European Commission, Berlin
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BD2 4 in a row

In March 2014, it appeared to some that the the crisis in the eurozone was over. Had Germany saved the single currency? All-night summits in Brussels and zillion-euro bailouts seemed to be things of the past. And Germany had settled into its new role — after being called on to take the lead, it was doing just that.

But had Angela Merkel’s government really won the arguments – and had its actions really made the difference? Did Germany share the blame for the high unemployment still blighting many countries?

Our second debate exposed Germany’s role in the crisis to real scrutiny with four speakers who had very different perspectives but one thing in common: they had all lived and breathed this crisis ever since it broke out.

Speakers

Proposition
Jörg Asmussen, State Secretary, Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs
Simon Nixon, Chief European Commentator, Wall Street Journal

Opposition
Megan Greene, Chief Economist, Maverick Intelligence
Thomas Mayer, Senior Advisor, Deutsche Bank

 

See press release.

In partnership with the European Commission Berlin.

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#BD1
»GDP has failed. It’s time to switch to a new measure of progress.«

30 August 2013
British Embassy, Berlin
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titel-GDP

Are we slaves to an outdated measure of progress? Critics of Gross Domestic Product (GDP or BIP) say we are – they say it’s time to move on from an index that reduces our societies to a warped tally of dollars, euros and cents. Others argue that GDP is an essential standard that we mess with at our peril. The first Berlin Debate pitted the two sides against each other.

Speakers

Proposition
Matthew Taylor
Chief Executive, RSA, London
Former Chief Advisor on Political Strategy to Prime Minister Tony Blair

Opposition
Karl-Heinz Paqué
Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg
Deputy Chair, FDP Federal Committee on the Economy; author of “Wachstum!”

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